Posts Tagged ‘HP’

No doubt every engineer has their own twist on coding something to better automate configurations and deployment on networks; however, with the every increasing pace of release changes to current software sets installed on some vendors hardware, the workload to keep your scripts updated can become your full time job. There will always be two schools of engineer: the home brew and the purchased software schools, each one with their own compelling reason to use the other and why the other is wrong. I, personally, prefer the purchased software route with a small dash of home brew scripts to accomplish my job, very small. I’ll outline some experiences I’ve had in the past where both moving towards the use of purchased software solved the many problems the home brew scripts were giving us and how a small, but powerful, set of home brew scripts gave us complete control over the network from building, deploying, operating, and debugging. Read the rest of this entry »


If you have an old HP Jet Direct card (perhaps an old dot matrix printer) and you’re looking to move from static IP configuration to DHCP you’ll want to telnet into the device and change the settings that way. I am not going into detail about how to do it because the menu is very basic to navigate via the CLI. Just know that you’re better off using telnet to access the menu-driven CLI as “root” and you’ll be happy.


A quick tidbit of information useful in troubleshooting and interviewing and reviewing the logs (if you can) before you start hacking away at the issue. It makes no sense to start diagnosing an issue if you have logs that can, hopefully, tell you what was going on before and after an event that caused an outage. For instance, if your wireless just decides to go down you may want to look at the lgos in the AP (autonomous mode) or the controller (Controller mode) and see what was happening. Given there is enough verbosity in the logs it should tell you what happened and you can take corrective measures. This applies to interviews because people always ask “What are your steps to figuring out what happened?” I always start with: I check the logs.


Classful routing/networking is no valid into today’s CIDR (Classes Inter-Domain Routing) networks; however, it seems that people are still over using the classful terminology almost interchangeably. The concept of classes in network is obsolete and should no longer be used when referencing network subnets because classful routing has defined network ranges that make them classful and CIDR does not. Read the rest of this entry »


To keep it short, it doesn’t support self signed certificates.

http://h17007.www1.hp.com/docs/interoperability/Cisco/HP-Networking-and-Cisco-CLI-Reference-Guide_June_10_WW_Eng_ltr.pdf

Page 88


If you’re using the HP A-series E5500 switches and find that filtering traffic between VLANS whose layer 3 interfaces reside on that switch are not working, I have found the solution if you’re using the 2215 code.

Quite simple, downgrade to the 2208 or 2210 code because as of this writing 08/21/2012 they are working on the bugs in the 2215 code


So as I study for the ASE I am reading the new HP Press books (that were purchased as bundle) for the test. Before this I was reading the older HP material that is in a wire bound book and was nothing more than HP copying crap from their website, print and wire bind it to a book. It was very dry, out of date, laced with grammatical errors and multiple configuration errors. Needless to say, the material is crap and I was excited to see that instead of trying to not be “Cisco Like” they joined the crowd and hired authors. Here is my review in comparison to the crap material that I read before… Read the rest of this entry »


HP vs Cisco Certifications

Being that I am a dual certification holder (HP and Cisco) I am going to weigh in on the Value of the certifications. Read the rest of this entry »


Core vs. Edge Routing Topology

There isn’t a lot of talk about this; however, there is a lot of training material that references this debate and makes recommendations for edge based routing. For those not familiar with the topic I am talking about “Campus LANs” and not ISP networks where you essentially have to push routing to the edge for some customers. In my article I am talking about Core vs Edge in the aspect of where we perform all of our routing in a “Campus LAN” Read the rest of this entry »


If you think that when HP purchased 3com they would have either made everything a single code release (can we say, Juniper) or at least provide interoperability documentation that is easier to find and easier to read? You’re dead wrong and you may end up like me and make an assumption that keeps you here longer than you would like to be trying to fix it. To spare you the agony of it all I will just jump right into it… Read the rest of this entry »